Scarlet Red Passion Flower (Passiflora vitifolia)

600px 2 IMG_6999 copyScarlet Red Passion Flower (Passiflora vitifolia) Aka Grape Leaved Passion Fruit, Flor de Pasión, Pasionaria, Granadilla de Monte, Tepezcuintle, Crimson Passion Flower, and Passion Vine, is a species of Passiflora, native to southern Central America (Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama) and northwestern South America (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru). It is also present in the West Indies. It is a vine with cylindric stems covered in red-brown hairs when young. Although I took this macro with settings of 1/6 sec; f/16; ISO 100; 60mm, I had to use a monopod to shoot at 1/6th of a second. They are so elaborate that the reason they are called ‘Passion’ flowers is that they are religious symbols of Christ’s Via Crucis. For example, its 3 stigmas represent the 3 nails and the 5 anthers below them the 5 wounds of Christ.d49ab-600px2img_5190copyThis is the same vine with leaves.  What I love about Passiflora is its extremely elaborate flowers with unique crowns, stamens, and convoluted styles. 1/60, f/14, ISO 200 @350mm,

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13 thoughts on “Scarlet Red Passion Flower (Passiflora vitifolia)

    • Thanks Adrian, that is really nice: the complexity of flora in the tropics is such that it requires a lot of investigation as to what has been naturalised here since this is such a small island; adding to that the biodiversity of the rain forest is so extensive that it needs to be narrowed down. P.R. has a very important rain forest; El Yunque, and I’m only yet beginning to introduce a few plants that grow there. So at some point in needs to be narrowed down.

    • Thanks Tammy, yes, they are so elaborate that the reason they are called ‘Passion’ flowers is that they are religious symbols of Christ’s Via Crucis. For example, its 3 stigmas represent the 3 nails and the 5 anthers below them the 5 wounds of Christ.

  1. Cultivated plants cannot be compared to the ones growing wild in their forest land. Once cultivated, they lose their natural pollinators and genetic biodiversity which makes them prone to diseases which may be very difficult to treat. Fighting these diseases can be more expensive in the long run than keeping them in cultivation. This is what happened to Tequiliana in Mexico. It is a plant that’s been in cultivation for so long that its isolation had made it very prone to unknown diseases and many crops were lost. Then investments in biogenetical engineering have to be made to save these plants and keep them viable for human consumption; and many times some decisions are made that may be detrimental for the environment. Naturalisation is another process. Naturalized plants continue their same growing patterns as the original plants from which they were introduced. They need no maintenance and grow wild in favourable climates.

    • Thanks Bob for stopping by. Yes, the Passion Flower’s story is very extensive because even when they have different varieties and colour; they all posses the same flower organs associated with Via Crucis’ symbolic and religious associations, which is how this genus was named.

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